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JOB ACCESSIBILITY BY BIKE: US METRO AREAS RANKING
-> A first-of-its-kind research study from the University of MN ranks the 50 largest (by population) metropolitan areas in the US for connecting workers with jobs via bicycle. (Access Across America: Biking 2017: https://bit.ly/2KBhU9w direct download) The study incorporates traffic stress and cycling comfort in its evaluation of access to destinations by bicycle. Rankings are determined by a weighted average of job accessibility; a higher weight is given to closer jobs, as jobs closer to origins are more easily reached, and are thus more valuable, than those further away. Jobs reachable within ten minutes are weighted most heavily, and jobs are given decreasing weights as travel time increases up to 60 minutes. The top 5 metro areas for job accessibility by bike are New York, NY; San Francisco, CA; Chicago, IL; Denver, CO; and Washington, DC. http://bit.ly/2M7Lsib

[See a related item in the Resources section: Accessibility Measurement for Project Prioritization in VA.]

MADRID, SPAIN: BACKLASH TO CAR BAN THREAT FROM NEW MAYOR
-> CityLab reported the new mayor of Madrid, Spain vowed to bring vehicles back to the city center. The strong citizen backlash suggests that European cities' car bans are not, in fact, in peril. When the city's current center-right/right/extreme-right coalition came to power following May 26 elections, one of its first promises was to scrap the laws that had seen almost all private cars disappear from inner Madrid-not just from side streets, but from major roads, too. After a whirlwind of protest, Madrid City Hall is pausing its plans to repeal the law. Across Europe there is widespread support for green urban policies even when the political pendulum swings right. http://bit.ly/2M3CO4n

US PM2.5 LOWER THAN AIR QUALITY STANDARD, THOUSANDS STILL DIE
-> Airqualitynews.com reported even though levels of PM2.5 are lower in the US than national ambient air quality standards, pollution is still costing thousands of lives. A study published in the journal PLOS Medicine, which analyzed publicly available data to directly estimate the number of deaths, by age group and sex, and loss of life expectancy due to current PM2.5 levels across the US, as well as the benefits of reductions since 1999. (Particulate Matter Air Pollution and National and County Life Expectancy Loss in the USA: A Spatiotemporal Analysis: http://bit.ly/2Kvah4H) Even though reductions in PM2.5 since 1999 have lowered mortality in the great majority of counties, researchers found that PM2.5 pollution in excess of the lowest observed concentration (2.8 μg/m3) was responsible for an estimated 30,000 deaths. http://bit.ly/2KvVRRQ

US SENATE TRANSPORTATION BILL GREAT FOR BIKING & WALKING
-> The American Bicyclist eNews reported the first draft of the Senate's Transportation bill (http://bit.ly/2KuzOe8) is great for biking and walking. The new bill makes key improvements to funding programs while also including a new set of climate-related programs and bicycle-friendly policy. Not only did the League get much of what it asked for on safety and infrastructure, bicyclists will benefit from new programs regarding emission and congestion reductions. Check out the details at http://bit.ly/2M5ljR7.

BILL INTRODUCED: BIKE SHARE ELIGIBLE FOR FEDERAL TRANSIT FUNDS
-> Streetsblog USA reported Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-Oregon), Ayanna Pressley (D-Mass.) and Rep. Vern Buchanan (R-Florida) - the chairs of Congress' Bike Caucus - this week introduced a bill known as the Bikeshare Transit Act of 2019 (http://bit.ly/2MbZcZF). They proposed changing federal laws so that bike-share programs would be eligible for federal transit money and for a large-grant program that is dedicated (theoretically anyway) to improving air quality. If it is approved, the new law would make billions in new federal funds available to support bike share. http://bit.ly/2M51nhj

BILL INTRODUCED: COMPLETE STREETS ACT
-> The National Complete Streets Coalition reported the proposed federal Complete Streets Act has the same structure as a successful Massachusetts law and does 3 basic things: 1) Sets aside federal funds to support Complete Streets projects (5% of annual federal highway funds); 2) Requires localities to adopt a Complete Streets policy that meets a minimum set of standards to access funding; and 3) Requires states to create a program to provide technical assistance and award funding for communities to build Complete Streets projects. (S. 2077: Complete Streets Act of 2019: http://bit.ly/2YouSk6 and H.R.3663 - Complete Streets Act of 2019: http://bit.ly/2YlrcQ8)
http://bit.ly/2M6A1rm

DRIVERS' PASSING DISTANCES LOWER FOR FEMALE CYCLISTS
-> Streetsblog USA reported new evidence suggests that women might justly fear for their safety when riding a bike. A new study measuring passing distances in Hennepin County, MN, finds that drivers are much more likely to pass female cyclists at an unsafe distance. (Bicycles, Gender, and Risk: Driver Behaviors When Passing Cyclists: http://bit.ly/2KA72sN) Researchers used radar to measure the passing distance on different kinds of streets - those with protected bike lanes, those with no bike infrastructure, and those with painted bike lanes. The study confirms female cyclists' concerns about safety on the road, and underscores the need for greater investment in safer facilities like protected bike lanes. http://bit.ly/2KwpMt1

COMPLIANCE WITH BICYCLE PASSING DISTANCE LAW IN AUSTRALIA
-> A study from the University of Adelaide reports on the levels of non-compliance with a new Australian law that requires drivers to provide more than 1 meter (just over 3 feet) of space when passing a cyclist on a road with a speed limit of 60 km/h (37 mph) or below, and 1.5 meters (nearly 5 feet) of space when passing a cyclist on a road with a speed limit above 60 km/h. To evaluate bicycle passing distances in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT), specialized passing distance measurement devices (PDMDs) were installed on a sample of 23 cyclists who ride in the ACT. An Evaluation of Bicycle Passing Distances in the ACT: http://bit.ly/2KwqXZt

SEARCH GOOGLE MAPS FOR BIKE SHARE STATIONS IN 24 CITIES
-> Engadget reported in 24 cities in 16 countries, Google Maps will now show bike-sharing stations and display how many bikes are available at each one. Or, if you're using a bike and you need to return it, you can see whether there is an empty space at a nearby station. (In North America: Chicago, Los Angeles, Montreal, New York City, San Francisco Bay Area, Toronto.) Google says more cities will be added soon. The system makes use of a feed of global bike-share information from the transit data company Ito World. https://engt.co/2M7OPWn

AMSTERDAM, THE NETHERLANDS: SAFE, BIKEABLE STREETS, NO FREE PARKING
-> An op-ed published by Streetsblog USA provides a history of how Amersterdam, The Netherlands, once as congested and car-choked as the worst Western cities, became the "bike capital" of the world. The city's $8-an-hour parking fees, residential permits, and limits to car ownership all played a role. Their technical solutions for overcoming car dominance can be applied to any city. http://bit.ly/2M529e6

MASS SHOOTINGS DESTROYING OUR SENSE OF PUBLIC SPACE
-> CityLab reported recent mass gunmen not only destroyed the victims' bodies and forever altered survivors' lives. In as little as a minute, they also tore new holes in the sense of safety and community that makes public life possible. Nothing endangers American public space in 2019 as much as mass shootings, says Yale sociologist Vida Bajc, who studies public space and security. Shootings also steal from people the sense that they inhabit a place, that it's their space. http://bit.ly/2Klezwp

WALES: WORLD'S FIRST FUTURE GENERATIONS COMMISSIONER
-> Positive.News reported Future Generations Commissioner for Wales Sophie Howe's job is to make tomorrow a better place. There's certainly no other role quite like it. Wales is currently the only country in the world to employ someone in such a position, which was created after the Welsh Assembly passed the Well-being of Future Generations Act in 2015 (http://bit.ly/2M731iy). The trailblazing legislation requires all Welsh public bodies to ensure that the decisions they make today don't compromise the Welsh citizens of tomorrow. http://bit.ly/2M4nwMH

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