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BROOKINGS INSTITUTION TO CONGRESS: RETHINK INFRASTRUCTURE GOALS
-> Streetsblog USA reported Congress should stop splurging on new highways and instead expand transit to help Americans break their century-long addiction to a device that is killing us, the car, a top Washington, DC think tank argues. A new report from the Brookings Institution says lawmakers must establish a new set of economic, social and environmental goals that seek to address income inequality, sprawl, and catastrophic climate change and then direct funding to localities based on those values. (To Fix our Infrastructure, Washington Needs to Start from Scratch: https://brook.gs/2YCgnqi) Lawmakers and policy leaders must ask themselves what they want transportation to achieve beyond congestion relief, which won't happen with wider roads. http://bit.ly/349LL0z

PED- & BIKE-CAR CRASH MEDIA COVERAGE MISSES ROLE OF DRIVERS
-> CityLab reported research suggests that media outlets tend to blame pedestrians and cyclists who are hit by cars. A paper published in the Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board reviewed 4,000 articles covering bike and pedestrian crashes over 2 months in 2018. (Editorial Patterns in Bicyclist and Pedestrian Crash Reporting: http://bit.ly/38pIr4J, also covered in CenterLines issue #479) Their detailed analysis of 200 articles found that local news coverage overwhelmingly shifted blame toward vulnerable road users and away from drivers. "Coverage almost always obscures the public health nature of the problem by treating crashes as isolated incidents, by referring to crashes as accidents, and by failing to include input from planners, engineers, and other road safety experts." Most descriptions of crashes used object-based language: "A car hit a cyclist," rather than "a driver." This pattern of coverage likely contributes to the limited public outcry about pedestrian and bicyclist fatalities. http://bit.ly/2P9PQ0A

[See also the Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board article "Framing the Bicyclist: A Qualitative Study of Media Discourse about Fatal Bicycle Crashes: http://bit.ly/2V1HXyV, also covered in CenterLines issue #486.]

NEW ZEALAND: TACKLING UNSAFE SPEEDS PACKAGE
-> Trafinz, from the New Zealand Local Authority Traffic Institute, reported the Government has announced its Tackling Unsafe Speeds package, which seeks to improve how councils and the NZ Transport Agency carry out speed management and requires road controlling authorities (RCAs) to adopt safer speed limits around schools (max 40 kph/25 mph). The package includes increasing the number of safety cameras, and transfers their ownership and operation to the Transport Agency from NZ Police. The package also changes the way speed limits are set. Limits will no longer be set through a bylaw-making process. RCAs will be required to develop speed management plans which will set out proposals for speed limit changes, engineering upgrades and safety infrastructure treatments. http://bit.ly/347Ow2n, p.9

COUNTERACTING SUV EMISSIONS & PED DEATHS
-> The Price Tags blog reported the SUV (sport utility vehicle) epidemic which is killing pedestrians and responsible for an alarming uptick in automobile emissions is finally getting national press attention. SUVs are the second largest contributor to the global increase in CO2 emissions in the last 10 years, and the SUV is solely responsible for a 46% increase in pedestrian deaths. European countries have policies to counteract SUV emissions. The City of Lausanne, Switzerland has petitioned their Council for a ban on SUVs within the city. Fees in France and other European countries tax drivers of high-emission vehicles, providing those funds back as rebates to drivers of low-emission vehicles. Road pricing by vehicular size, weight and carbon emissions might make sense to shift towards public transit, and less ecologically damaging ways to travel. http://bit.ly/2Ed1Nfv

HIGH PM2.5 AS BAD FOR HEALTH AS SMOKING 150 CIGARETTES/YEAR
-> AirQualityNews.com reported living for one year in an area with high levels of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is as bad for human health as smoking 150 cigarettes a year, according to the British Heart Foundation. To come up with the figure, the charity first estimated the average annual levels of PM2.5 exposure for the whole UK population (8μg/m3) and then equated breathing this density of PM2.5 directly to the equivalent number of cigarettes. They scaled the number up to figure out how much daily exposure to PM2.5 is equal to smoking one daily cigarette, which they believe is around 28.8 8μg/m3. So if you were to stay in a polluted area that had an average PM2.5 of 28.8μg/m3 for that day, it would have the equivalent effect on your health as staying in an area with no pollution and smoking one cigarette. Average daily PM2.5 in the ten worst-polluted local authorities, which are all in the Greater London area, is 12.2μg/m3, which would equate to smoking 155 cigarettes per year. http://bit.ly/359NiVH

CASE FOR INCREASING DIVERSITY IN TRANSPORTATION WORKFORCE
-> A TR News article details demographic trends shaping the nation's workforce--the large millennial population, the rise of neurodiverse workers, and dramatically increased ethnic diversity. The authors note recent studies show that organizations with the most diverse workforces realize better decision-making and more efficiency, innovation, and profitability than do their less diverse peers. They conclude that increasing diversity in the transportation business not only is essential to agency mission achievement, but also can be a force for improved performance. http://bit.ly/38tZqTQ

THE NETHERLANDS: RIDING FROM DELFT TO THE HAGUE IN THE DARK
-> A Bicycle Dutch blog post described riding the almost 10 km (6.2 miles) from Delft to The Hague in the dark on a Saturday night and documented the route with videos, maps and other graphics. http://bit.ly/35lnBSt

SHARE WHAT YOU'VE LEARNED: W/B/P CALL FOR PROPOSALS OPEN UNTIL JAN. 3
-> Share what you've learned about getting things done with your peers from many disciplines across the walking, bike and placemaking fields. The 2020 Walk/Bike/Places Indianapolis Call for Proposals is open until January 3, 2020: http://bit.ly/31XVKow. As a Breakout Presenter, Peer Coach, or Poster Presenter, your implementation expertise can help others succeed. Celebrate your successes, insights and challenges. Multiply your connections with leaders, influencers and thought partners, and deepen these relationships. Get ideas and inspiration for future projects. Be part of making this the most dynamic conference in the walking, biking and placemaking fields.

Walk/Bike/Places is North America's largest active transportation and placemaking conference. Held every 2 years, Walk/Bike/Places is a unique conference experience that combines experiential learning while walking and biking the streets of the host city with nearly 100 expert-led breakout sessions and locally led workshops. The 2020 Walk/Bike/Places conference, focused on implementation, will be held in Indianapolis, IN August 4 to 7, 2020. http://bit.ly/WalkBikePlaces2020

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