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WALK/BIKE/PLACES 2020 EARLY REGISTRATION THRU MARCH 31
-> Early Registration for Walk/Bike/Places 2020 is now open through March 31, 2020. (http://bit.ly/WalkBikePlaces2020) Take advantage of the lowest rates available for North America's longest running and most progressive transportation and placemaking conference. Based on what we are seeing from our recent call for proposals, you are in store for our strongest program on walking, biking, and placemaking yet. To make the conference fairer and more accessible, we have realigned our registration categories. Rather than a registration price based on whether you are a delegate or presenter; now your price will be based on the sector in which you are employed -- private ($550), non-profit ($500), public ($475), and students and recent graduates ($200). These early registration prices go up after March 31. A limited number of scholarships will also be available. We will give preference to local applicants and those with a demonstrated financial need. Previous recipients are ineligible. We will provide application details this spring. http://bit.ly/31qaNch

CITIES CAN ACHIEVE VISION ZERO GOALS THROUGH BASIC DESIGN
-> Smart Cities Dive reported cities with rail transit, small blocks and dense, low-speed road networks have fewer transportation-related injuries, according to a new study published in The Lancet Planetary Health. (A Global Analysis of Urban Design Types and Road Transport Injury: An Image Processing Study: http://bit.ly/2v456EM) The most injury-prone cities had sparse road networks and less rail infrastructure, the study found. Researchers from Australia, Spain and the United States analyzed maps of about 1,700 cities around the world and grouped them into nine unique types based on the amount of rail network, road design and the amount of open green and park space. http://bit.ly/2tyYP3w

PROPOSED HOUSE BILL: $2.5B OVER 5 YEARS FOR BIKE, PED PROJECTS
-> Route Fifty reported the federal government would offer up to $500 million annually in competitive grant funding for sidewalks, bikeways and other "active transportation" projects for cyclists and pedestrians, under a bill proposed recently in the US House. (H.R.5696 - Connecting America's Active Transportation System Act: http://bit.ly/2GRJiyP). The bill offers a new "framework" for infrastructure investment as Congress works to develop a new transportation funding bill for roads and transit that would replace the 5-year program that is set to expire in September. A highway bill that the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee passed last summer would authorize a total of $287 billion over five years. (America's Transportation Infrastructure Act of 2019 : http://bit.ly/2KuzOe8) That bill proposes increasing funding for pedestrian and bicycling infrastructure by 40% to $1.2 billion per year. http://bit.ly/2vR4YJ6

US HOUSE PRINCIPLES: CONNECT TRANSPORTATION SPENDING TO TANGIBLE OUTCOMES
-> Transportation for America and the National Complete Streets Coalition released a statement regarding the principles for infrastructure released recently by the House majority of the Transportation & Infrastructure Committee. The new transportation policy framework released today by the House majority and Chairman Peter DeFazio could finally represent a long-awaited step toward aligning the billions we spend on transportation with the outcomes people care about: fixing crumbling infrastructure, prioritizing saving people's lives on our roadways, and connecting people to jobs and daily necessities. For the last 40 years, lawmakers have largely focused on pouring more money into a broken federal program that fails to hold states accountable for maintaining our infrastructure, produces more congestion, makes safety secondary, and fails to affordably and efficiently connect us to the things we need. http://bit.ly/2GS1zMi

LAB & OURSTREETS TO CROWDSOURCE DANGEROUS DRIVER BEHAVIOR
-> The League of American Bicyclists reported they are partnering with OurStreets (http://bit.ly/3baUMeA) to scope the totality of dangerous driver behavior that bicyclists face on a daily basis across the country. All reports to OurStreets feed into a dashboard that will allow League staff to easily gather insights overlaid with crash data, citation data and other relevant data sources to drive advocacy for safer streets. They will be working with the OurStreets team to dive deeper into the data and tell unique stories that OurStreets reports will be able to facilitate. The OurStreets team has also partnered with local League-member advocacy groups like the Alexandria Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee, Bike Baton Rouge, Bike Pittsburgh, Bike Indianapolis, Fairfax Alliance for Better Bicycling, and the Washington Area Bicyclist Association to connect regional OurStreets reports directly to local advocates. OurStreets is available now for download on both Android and iOS and crowdsources the reporting of dangerous driving like blocking of bike lanes and crosswalks, near misses and aggressive driving. http://bit.ly/2SwOopJ

[See Regional and Local Actions section for Washington, DC to use photo-ticketing to fine drivers for driving or parking in bike lanes.]

LITTLE VEHICLES: NOT-A-CAR OPTIONS FOR SHORT TRIPS
-> Public Square reported in the US, nearly half of all car trips are less than 3 miles, and 20% of car trips are under 1 mile. For these kinds of trips, we need an alternative to the car. Traditionally that alternative has been the bicycle. Bicycles have many of the attributes of a personal vehicle. But bicycles have disadvantages as well. They require physical effort, especially on hills. They expose the rider to the weather. It can be difficult to carry cargo or passengers on a bike. Now, however, new kinds of bikes and other light vehicles seek to overcome these obstacles. Benjamin Schneider at CityLab calls these "Little Vehicles." (The industry term is "micromobility," but "Little Vehicles" is so much clearer and to the point.) Little Vehicles include not only bikes and scooters, but e-bikes, velomobiles, motorized skateboards, unicycles, "hoverboards," and other small, battery-powered low-speed not-a-cars. Little Vehicles are addressing some of the practicality and comfort issues that have kept people from giving up their cars. http://bit.ly/2GRuyjk

HEALTH & EQUITY MUST BE AT THE HEART OF PLACEMAKING
-> State of Place shared a 5-step approach to creating mobile healthy places to start a discussion around how the principles that guide great placemaking and tactical urbanism can (and should) be applied as a way to address the inequitable access to mobility, health, quality of life, and great places. "Tactical urbanism" can activate existing community assets or underutilized spaces into public places that make vital health resources accessible to vulnerable populations. State of Place refers to these activations as "mobile, healthy places." They argue that these places can and should be identified and defined by the communities that need them most, but can include access to health services, public space, healthy food, social events, etc. http://bit.ly/397rf3G

VIENNA, AUSTRIA: CULTURAL INCENTIVES FOR GOING CAR FREE
-> CityLab reported the City of Vienna, Austria offers those who travel on foot, bike, or public transit the opportunity to visit a museum or theater for free. Starting as a pilot project next month, Vienna's "Kultur-Token" (Culture Token) will track users' movements--and their chosen mode of transit--across the city via an app. (http://bit.ly/31q6zRO, use Google Translate to read page in English) For each car-free kilometer the user travels, the app stores up credits. Once the user has stored up 20 kilograms of carbon savings--possible with about two weeks of car-free commuting--they get a token they can exchange for a ticket to various arts venues, including Vienna's most respected concert hall, theater, and contemporary art venue. Vienna isn't alone in offering a diverse menu of incentives to entice people away from their cars. http://bit.ly/2GSYECX

UK TO BAN THE SALE OF GAS & HYBRID CARS BY 2035
-> Gizmodo reported United Kingdom Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced that his government would accelerate its ban on the sale of gas- and diesel-run vehicles from 2040 to 2035. Leaders are even adding hybrids to the mix for the first time. The war on gas guzzling cars is a key part of stopping climate change, particularly in countries like the UK as the transport sector makes up 33% of its greenhouse gas emissions there, making it the largest chunk of the nation's emissions. And the UK isn't alone. Spain is trying to accomplish the same thing by 2040. Costa Rica wants to ban all fossil fuels by next year. Removing cars from the road isn't all that we need to do. Leaders need to invest in effective public transit systems, bike lanes, and other forms of transit that can replace cars. http://bit.ly/2Sl0yBJ

NEW DUTCH NEIGHBORHOOD: 1 SHARED CAR FOR EVERY 3 HOUSEHOLDS
-> Fast Company reported Merwede, a neighborhood in the Dutch city of Utrecht, will be home to 12,000 people on a nearly 60-acre site in southwest Utrecht, with a focus on walking and cycling, as well as public transportation that connects to all parts of the Netherlands. A fleet of shared cars and bicycles will be available to everyone living there. Instead of 1 car (or multiple cars) per household, filling the streets with congestion and parking spaces, Merwede will have 1 car for every 3 households. "By having this car-free area, we can design spaces without the straightjacket [or] rules of the car, and thus focus on essentials for a high density area, which is the quality of public space, city on eye level, green, biodiversity, climate adaptation and meeting places for social interaction," said Marco Broekman, the architect whose firm led the design for the urban plan. "With the car-free area and low parking norm, we want to set a standard for new high density neighborhoods, and want to set the right conditions so people can change their behavior; from a car dependent to more sustainable and healthy ways of transportation." http://bit.ly/2UpbqB9

DUTCH CYCLE TUNNEL ART
-> The Bicycle Dutch blog reported most cycle tunnels in the Netherlands have a work of art on their walls. One of the reasons is that art makes the tunnels less scary. A cycle tunnel in Zaltbommel was dedicated to a local artist whose cheerful iconic drawings have been recreated on the tunnel walls. The work of art on the tunnel walls cost about 60,000 Euros (US$66,270), mostly for the protective coating. See photos and a brief narrated video at: http://bit.ly/380HyPw Check out more cycle tunnel art at: http://bit.ly/2OsHnVI.

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