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GOOGLE MAPS ADDS MULTIMODAL TRIP PLANNING
-> Smart Cities Dive reported Google Maps launched a new multimodal trip-planning feature that incorporates bicycling, ride-hailing and transit options into one trip. Users enter a destination, tap "directions" and then tap the transit tab. (http://bit.ly/2ZGEzqI) The app will display routes that include cycling and ride-hailing as first- and last-mile options along with transit directions. It will display details for each leg of the trip including ride cost, wait times, potential traffic and transit departure times. The ride-hailing feature will be available throughout the US, and the cycling feature initially will roll out in 10 cities. At this point shared scooter information is not included, but may be added later. http://bit.ly/2ZKiDuw

ONE THING WE CAN DO: DRIVE LESS
-> The New York Times reported that even driving just 10% less - if everyone did it - would have a big impact on greenhouse gas emissions. That's because Americans drive trillions of miles every year, helping to make transportation the biggest contributor to United States greenhouse gas emissions. A 10% cut, therefore, would be roughly 110 million metric tons of carbon dioxide, or the same as taking about 28 coal-fired power plants offline for a year. To achieve such a reduction, every American driver would, on average, have to cut about 1,350 miles per year. https://nyti.ms/2LiwtAr

AUSTRALIAN STATE TO BUILD $4M IN NEW PED & BIKE INFRASTRUCTURE
-> SmartCitiesWorld reported in Australia the state of New South Wales (NSW) announced it is funding the construction of 4 new cycleways in Sydney as part of a $600m ($407m USD) project in pedestrian and cycling infrastructure across the state. The project will connect existing cycleways to create continuous, safe and separated routes to help people of all ages and riding abilities get in and out of the city centre. Construction on the proposed new separated cycleways, bike crossing and shared path connections is scheduled to begin this financial year. Daily bike trips across the city of Sydney increased by 145% between March 2010 and March 2019. At more than 20 sites, bike trips have tripled since independent counts began - with growth highest on the separated bike links. http://bit.ly/2LeEExG

E-BIKES NOW ALLOWED IN US NATIONAL PARKS
-> Engadget reported E-bikes are now allowed in US National Parks. There are concerns they could be unsafe and harmful to the parks. The National Park Service has expanded the use of e-bikes to allow pedal assist models on the same roads and trails as conventional bicycles so long as they cut off assistance at 28MPH. Officials contend that the policy shift could make parks more accessible and "mitigate" environmental damage while ensuring uses similar to traditional bikes. https://engt.co/2ZQgayJ

AMSTERDAM, THE NETHERLANDS: PED & CYCLIST CONFLICTS
-> CityLab reported the City of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, is trying to ease conflicts between those on bikes and on foot. An oncoming cyclist may barrel through a red light or crosswalk or suddenly swerve onto the sidewalk. Cyclists in Amsterdam often park their bikes haphazardly, cluttering street corners and blocking the passage of strollers, wheelchairs, and suitcase-bearing tourists. Efforts to educate cyclists or tame two-wheelers are met with opprobrium in anti-authoritarian Amsterdam, according to "street coaches" hired by the city to do so. The city's 5-year Bicycle Plan prioritizes both pedestrians and cyclists. It has commissioned a study into conflicts between pedestrians and cyclists that will be published this fall. http://bit.ly/2ZF3Gdq

UTRECHT, THE NETHERLANDS, 2009 AND 2019
-> A recent Bicycle Dutch blog contrasts video, still photos and descriptions of bicycling infrastructure in Utrecht, The Netherlands, 10 years ago with the same areas now. Check out how the city has since retired some motorways or placed them below grade, significantly widened narrow walkways, and cut down a lot of trees. http://bit.ly/2ZNC5qz

TRANSPORT SYSTEM BIASES AGAINST WOMEN
-> Streetsblog USA reported the book Invisible Women uncovers the way designing essentially everything with the default user being an average-size man puts women at risk. (https://amzn.to/2ZMAZLq). The world we live in is designed by men - for men. This article compiles a long list of examples of how gender bias plays out in transportation and city building. These include female crash test dummies not used until 2011, lack of protected bike infrastructure, too much focus on commuting, buses not accommodating strollers, and societal norms and real fears against walking at night, among other biases. http://bit.ly/2ZMAIYU

GENDER BIAS IN SNOW PLOWING POLICY
-> 99% Invisible reported on a gender study about the unlikely subject of snow plowing patterns conducted in a small town in Sweden. The town's approach appeared logical and neutral enough: plow major roads first, particularly those leading into and out of town, followed by smaller local streets. Researchers discovered that men mainly commuted to and from work, and women drove all over to run errands and to take care of elderly family members. They also walked more, trudging across often-unplowed intersections, sometimes with kids in tow. Aside from health and safety, that labor, when tallied up, was found to be worth almost as much to the economy as paid work. The city council looked at the findings and reversed their approach, plowing side roads and sidewalks first. It had a huge impact, reducing the people admitted to emergency centers, women in particular, and had a corresponding economic impact from lower healthcare costs. Driving through a few inches of snow was less dangerous than walking through it, particularly if one has a baby carriage as well. http://bit.ly/2ZHeK9W

TORONTO, CANADA, VISION ZERO 2.0 GOAL: NO DEATHS, SERIOUS INJURIES
-> A recent Price Tags blog reported the residents of Toronto, Canada, have protested against road violence and demanded change in making their city streets and places safer for vulnerable road users. The City of Toronto originally implemented a 2016 Vision Zero plan that did not aim at the complete reduction of road deaths and serious injuries, but rather a percentage of fewer fatalities. In a June 2019 reboot of Vision Zero called "2.0"-Road Safety Update (http://bit.ly/2Ljfw9i) Toronto's Engineering Staff got serious about the safe systems approach, with Council adopting a speed management strategy, road design improvements, and an education and engagement plan. As well, two pedestrian death traps were identified for special attention: mid-block crossings (responsible for 50 percent of pedestrian deaths); and vehicles turning through crosswalks (causing 25 percent of deaths). The City also directly stated that their goal was now no deaths or serious injuries on the road, which is the true Vision Zero approach. http://bit.ly/2Lk2Q1R

MONTREAL, CANADA, NEW POLICE EQUIPMENT ENFORCES PASSING LAW
-> CBC-News reported Montreal, Canada, police on bicycles are using new C3FT ultrasonic distance detectors to ensure motorists are leaving enough space as they pass cyclists. On roads with a speed limit of 50 km/h (31 mph) or less, drivers must leave at least one meter (just over three feet) between their car and a bicycle when passing. On roads with higher speed limits, drivers must give 1.5 meters (nearly five feet) of space. This applies even if the cyclist is in a separate bike lane. Drivers can be fined $313 (US$235), including fees, and receive two demerit points. http://bit.ly/2LeAvtJ

CYCLISTS & E-SCOOTERS CLASH ON EUROPE'S STREETS
-> Time reported the growth of e-scooter use has brought a slew of problems, including safety risks, parking, and impassable sidewalks. Many scooter users advocate for creating the kind of infrastructure - wide bike lanes, ample parking - found in cycling-friendly cities like Copenhagen and Amsterdam. But those cities are also learning, e-scooters and bikes don't necessarily play well together. Read how different cities in the US and Europe are responding to the growth of e-scooters. http://bit.ly/2ZM7tFM

VANCOUVER, CANADA, JOURNALISTS INVESTIGATE SIDEWALKS
-> Price Tags reported that 3 recent journalism school graduates investigated why sidewalks are the way they are in Vancouver, Canada, and what citizens can do about them. They found a lack of knowledge about recourse when it comes to injuries caused by sidewalks, infrastructure sorely neglected by the city, and a maintenance system that may not be adequately serving the public's needs, leading to questions about liability. http://bit.ly/2LhRJX9

GROWTH OF FOOD DELIVERY CARGO E-BIKE USE IN US CITIES
-> Forbes reported e-bikes are gaining traction on American streets, including for food delivery. Domino's Pizza is expanding its use of custom-made delivery e-bikes in select US cities. The bikes are designed with front and rear insulated soft-sided cargo areas, reflective materials for visibility, and have lights on the front and rear. Domino's points to many advantages to using the e-bikes. Not only does it make it simpler to carry bigger loads on bikes, it makes deliveries in hilly cities significantly easier and more time-efficient. This also allows Domino's to hire a wider range of prospective workers who might not have licenses to operate cars. http://bit.ly/2Lg2Rnh

[A large New York City courier and logistics company seeks full-time and part-time couriers who can handle cargo bikes, and e-bikes pulling trailers, for route work in Manhattan. One project involves leaving from a Midtown warehouse each evening between 5 and 8 pm with small bags organized by neighborhood. Another project involves doing small grocery deliveries. https://indeedhi.re/2ZJmxEh]

WALKING & BIKING TO SCHOOL
-> Next City reported the percentage of students walking or biking to school has decreased dramatically over time, from 42% in 1969 to only 10% in 2017. At an individual level, walking and biking can boost students' health, physical activity, and even their concentration in school. If more students walked or biked to school, there could also be meaningful benefits in terms of environmental health and student safety. The problem is that right now, too many families don't perceive walking or biking as safe, and unfriendly infrastructure in many communities does little to dissuade them. http://bit.ly/2ZMIS3B

EUROPEAN CARDIOLOGISTS: AIR POLLUTION WARNING
-> AirQualityNews.com reported for the first time, the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) has included in its guidelines the impact of air pollution on patients with chronic heart problems. Alongside several risk factors for heart disease, including poor diet, smoking and a lack of exercise, they say air pollution is now recognized to be one of the 10 leading risk factors for global mortality and exposure to pollutants increases the risk of heart attacks as well as hospitalization and death from heart failure or strokes. It says that patients with heart disease should avoid areas with heavy traffic congestion and may consider wearing a respirator face mask. http://bit.ly/2LlBxEt

SEPTEMBER 20 IS PARK(ING) DAY
-> PARK(ing) Day, held every third Friday in September, is a worldwide event where parking spots are transformed into temporary public parks. PARK(ing) Day, a worldwide movement to challenge and repurpose urban space by temporarily transforming metered parking spaces into public parks. The first PARK was erected in downtown San Francisco in October 2005. http://bit.ly/2ZMAK3d

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