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T4A NEW ACCOUNTABLE GUIDING PRINCIPLES FOR TRANSPORTATION INVESTMENT
-> Transportation for America (T4A) announced three new guiding principles for transportation investment that are concrete, measurable, and have outcomes. Taxpayers should be able to expect these specifics of our federal transportation program that spends tens of billions of dollars annually. These principles and outcomes paint a vision of a safer, more equitable, and more accessible transportation system for the country: 1) Prioritize maintenance by dedicating formula highway funds to maintenance; 2) design for safety over speed; 3) connect people to jobs and services rather than focus on speed. http://bit.ly/31fcyY5

BENEFITS OF PUBLIC INVESTMENT IN WALKING & BIKING CONNECTIVITY
-> Rails-to-Trails Conservancy released a report that reveal the potential annual return on investment of connected active-transportation infrastructure could be over $73 billion in a modest scenario and over $138 billion in a substantial scenario. (Active Transportation Transforms America: The Case for Increased Public Investment in Walking and Biking Connectivity: http://bit.ly/35xH82t) This report shows that these facilities provide an incredible return on investment in the form of benefits that enable more users to connect to their destinations by walking or biking; improve people's health and reduce the cost of health care; reduce greenhouse gases and oil dependence; and encourage economic investment in our communities. http://bit.ly/35GdcB1

AAA: PED DETECTION SYSTEMS DONÕT WORK WHEN NEEDED MOST
-> AAA reported their research found that vehicles with automatic emergency braking systems with pedestrian detection perform inconsistently, and proved to be completely ineffective at night. (Automatic Emergency Braking with Pedestrian Detection: http://bit.ly/2pn9dsI) An alarming result, considering 75% of pedestrian fatalities occur after dark. The systems were also challenged by real-world situations, like a vehicle turning right into the path of an adult. AAA's testing found that in this simulated scenario, the systems did not react at all, colliding with the adult pedestrian target every time. For the safety of everyone on the road, AAA supports the continued development of pedestrian detection systems, specifically when it comes to improving functionality at night and in circumstances where drivers are most likely to encounter pedestrians. http://bit.ly/32ixH4G

PROBLEMS W/ NEW TESLA FEATURE THAT SUMMONS EMPTY CAR TO YOU
-> An ARS Technica article described a reporter's experience in watching over 100 Tesla Smart Summon videos and what he learned. In late September, Tesla released a major software update that included its new Smart Summon feature. A customer can summon their car from across a parking lot with no one inside-though the owner is expected to continuously monitor the car from outside. Smart Summon worked well enough for most owners, but a fair number of them experienced problems: one had his cousin walk in front of his Tesla car as it turned out of a parking spot. The car got uncomfortably close to his cousin before he halted the test. Tesla cars don't seem to understand the physical environment around them. See the video examples and the full article: http://bit.ly/32hoGJk

NYT OP-ED: CARS ARE DEATH MACHINES. SELF-DRIVING TECH WON'T CHANGE THAT.
-> In a New York Times op-ed, columnist Alison Arieff recognized that cars are death machines and self-driving tech won't change that. Frustrated by the lack of change from crash statistics alone, she conducted an experiment on Twitter, asking people to share her tweet if a car had hit them, or anyone they knew. It was shared thousands of times and more than 500 people shared stories of being hit, losing family and friends, and sustaining injuries that impact their daily lives. Many say that autonomous or smart cars will solve this. But if keeping people safe means putting the responsibility on them--or worse, criminalizing walking and biking--we need to think twice about the technology we're developing. https://nyti.ms/35xe5Mi

NACTO: BLUEPRINT FOR AUTONOMOUS URBANISM, 2ND ED.
-> NACTO observed a human-focused autonomous future won't materialize on its own. Cities need to make decisions today to ensure autonomous technologies improve outcomes in our communities, rather than perpetuate harm. NACTO's newest edition of the Blueprint for Autonomous Urbanism (http://bit.ly/2QgVWPu) focuses on four key policy areas--transit, freight, pricing, and data--that will help cities form the bedrock of a sustainable, people-focused future. With a fully-autonomous age on the horizon, cities must work rapidly to change their streets before yesterday's values become enshrined in tomorrow's concrete. http://bit.ly/2MINBPr

WHY ARE PEOPLE DRIVING KILLING MORE & MORE PEOPLE ON FOOT?
-> In a long read article, The Guardian considered that for drivers, roads are safer than ever--but for people on foot, they are getting deadlier. Car companies and Silicon Valley claim that they have the solution. In almost every country in the world, regardless of national prosperity, it remains on average more dangerous, per mile of travel, to be a pedestrian than to be a car driver or passenger. Much of our discourse around cars, self-driving or otherwise, is less about transforming the status quo than maintaining it. http://bit.ly/35ziu1f

VIDEOS: SAFETY ISSUES WOMEN FACE USING TRANSPORTATION
-> The Transportation Research Board announced videos are available of the themes of the 6th International Conference on Women's Issues in Transportation: Insights, Inclusion, and Impact: Framing the Future for Women in Transportation. Women's safety and security when using transportation is a global concern. In these videos, leaders from around the world discuss government programs and campaigns keeping women safe and secure while in transit. The first video is a five-minute summary, and the second is a 27-minute exploration of the issues women face when using transportation. http://bit.ly/2ITchUn

STIRLING, SCOTLAND: FREE SCHOOL BIKE SHARE PROGRAM
-> BBC News reported nextbike launched a free school bike share program in Stirling, Scotland that will give teenagers over 14 years old easy access to bike share and hopefully instill active travel habits. Nextbike dropped its normal policy that only those over 18 years old can take out membership, and membership will be free for students for the first 12 months. This bike share program is the first ever in the United Kingdom for students. https://bbc.in/2Mkki6Y

AMSTERDAM, THE NETHERLANDS CONSIDERS MORE CAR-FREE STREETS
-> CityLab reported that private cars in Amsterdam, The Netherlands take a back seat to bicycles. Roughly two-thirds of urban journeys in the Dutch capital take place on two wheels, and only 19% of citizens use cars every day. Still, there are a lot of cars left in the city, and they're causing tension for everyone else. In an effort to ease the clash of mobility modes and achieve its ultimate goal of becoming a “car-free city,” a member of the municipal legislature recently announced several new measures to make it harder for motorists to use at least 10 central streets as through-routes, using one-way systems, roadway narrowing, and barriers. To further encourage drivers to give up their keys, the city also announced plans to open the Amsterdam Metro all night on weekends starting in 2021, and to make all weekend transit free for children under 12. Meanwhile, City Hall is already mulling a more sweeping plan--not just to restrict through-traffic, but to ban it altogether. http://bit.ly/2MOGtAT

NORWAY: NEW ART MUSEUM IS ALSO A TWISTING BRIDGE ABOVE A RIVER
-> AFAR reported a new art museum in Jevnaker, Norway (about an hour north of Oslo) is also a 200-foot long pedestrian bridge over the Randselva River. The Twist, a striking new art museum is equal parts inhabitable sculpture and innovative exhibition space. http://bit.ly/2MfrWzn

RESEARCH ON EDGE LANE ROADS (ABLS) SEEKS INTERNATIONAL EXAMPLES
-> Research on edge lane roads, also known as Advisory Bike Lanes or Advisory Shoulders, is evaluating their possible use on low-volume roads with speeds above 35 MPH/60 kph. The effort is looking for domestic or international examples of these roads or equivalent one-lane roads supporting two-way traffic. Send examples to Michael Williams at bikepedx@gmail.com. For more information on the Rural ABL Project go to http://bit.ly/2JwvytW.

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