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IN MOST STATES WALK, BIKE, ROLL DEATHS & SERIOUS INJURIES GROW
-> Smart Growth America released an interim update to a 2019 report that found most states continue to see increases in deaths and serious injuries among people walking, biking, and rolling. (Dangerous by Design 2020: http://bit.ly/2NNdYoS) Using the latest data from 2009-2018, they found that while there is some minor shuffling, the rankings mostly remain the same as in last year's report. (FL and AL remain the first and second most dangerous states.) Their 2020 update includes for the first time, serious injuries among all people using non-motorized transportation in addition to fatalities, and the comparison of this carnage to the safety goals states set for themselves. In all, 33 states and DC failed their "safety" targets. http://bit.ly/38mTZoC See how your state has done in recent years: http://bit.ly/2iZ9lHv

FL, TX & CA ACCOUNT FOR 41% OF CYCLIST FATALITIES
-> Smart Cities Dive reported FL, TX and CA are home to 13 of the 20 most dangerous US cities for cyclists, according to a new analysis of National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) data. (The 20 Most Dangerous U.S. Cities for Cyclists [+Death Totals]: http://bit.ly/2NNZ8hK) Collectively, the three states accounted for 41% of all cyclist fatalities in the U.S. between 2014 and 2017. The analysis found that cyclist deaths increased 25% between 2010 and 2017, with 783 cyclist fatalities nationwide in 2017 alone. According to a NHTSA report released in October, the number of cyclist fatalities rose to 857 in 2018. Cities with above-average rates of cyclist fatalities per number of residents and communities were clustered in the Southeast, which also tended to have below-average rates of overall bike commuters. http://bit.ly/2NMxjWU

PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE PROPOSES NATIONAL VISION ZERO POLICY
-> CityLab reported that Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg released a new infrastructure plan that links road building with road safety. (Building for the 21st Century: An Infrastructure Plan to Create Jobs, Increase Resilience, & Usher in a New Era of Opportunity: http://bit.ly/36hiGS7) Currently, no other presidential candidate that is still in the race has committed to a national Vision Zero policy. As president, he'd commit to a national Vision Zero policy. To nudge transportation agencies to deliver on safety goals, Buttigieg's plan uses carrots and sticks: incentives to states and localities that invest in rebuilding unsafe streets, and the threat of infrastructure cuts to those that don't make progress. http://bit.ly/2sKqNZy

DRIVERS AS GUESTS: HOW OSLO, NORWAY CUT TRAFFIC DEATHS TO 1
-> SmartCitiesWorld reported that in 2019, a single driver died in a traffic accident in Oslo, Norway down from 5 in 2018. No pedestrians, children or cyclists at all were killed on the roads last year. Norway has a 'vision zero' strategy, implemented in 2001, focused on reducing crashes that can lead to fatalities and serious injuries. It includes cutting average road speeds and increasing the number of safety features in cars. The governing mayor of Oslo said large investments in public transport, bicycle lanes and facilities for pedestrians, along with restrictions on car use and speed limits, contributed to the achievement in Oslo. "Car traffic will always be a part of the city, but the drivers should act as guests," he said. "That is why we have reduced the speed limit for cars, reduced parking opportunities in the city centre, built more speed bumps, closed certain streets for car traffic and are rolling out car-free zones around schools." http://bit.ly/2RehWsG

PARIS, FRANCE: MAYOR PROPOSES CITY CENTER BE 100% BIKE
-> CityLab reported that the Mayor of Paris, France facing a reelection vote in March unveiled proposals this week that include a plan to make the city center "100 percent bicycle." The plan to make inner Paris a bicycle-first city does not come with a specific timetable attached, and suggests a simple continuation of the tough car-removing policies with which the Mayor has already made a name for herself. The plan would see more express cycling routes, segregated with raised medians, and lane space allotted to bikes across the city. This space would be largely taken from current space allotted to cars, while a pedestrianization plan will continue to sweep motor vehicles away from major streets. Such changes are indeed within the mayor's power, though they have been challenged (unsuccessfully) in the past by regional leaders claiming that they are unfair to suburban commuters. http://bit.ly/2RgzPXD

PERSONALIZED SMARTPHONE MESSAGES & INCENTIVES SHIFT TRAVEL PATTERNS
-> Tools of Change reported a peer section panel awarded Bologna, Italy's Bella Mossa program its Landmark case study designation. Bella Mossa awarded participants points for cycling, walking or using public transport that could be redeemed for discounts or payment towards merchandise and services from 85 retailers, including supermarkets, sports retailers, bike stores, opticians, bookshops, cinemas, restaurants and bars. In 2018, 10,000 people reported taking 995,000 trips by alternative transportation methods, totaling 3.7 million kilometers (2.3 million miles) and saving 711 tons of CO2. http://bit.ly/2GcD4ZV

MOOVIT & CUBIC HELP COMMUTERS PAY, PLAN MULTIMODAL TRIPS
-> Smart Cities Dive reported transit technology firm Cubic Transportation Systems will partner with urban mobility platform Moovit on a mobility as a service (MaaS) app that will integrate Cubic's ticketing and payment systems with Moovit's multi-modal trip planning. Through the partnership, Cubic's Traveler App will include Moovit's MaaS data, including service alerts, arrival information and trip planning options including car-sharing, ride-sharing, bike and scooter services. The two companies also signed a strategic agreement to explore future collaborations on MaaS offerings. Israel-based Moovit has information on 3,000 cities across 96 countries and holds what it calls the "world's largest repository of transit & urban mobility data." Cubic, meanwhile, controls payments and has employed its Traveler app for major transit agencies in cities like Los Angeles, Chicago, London and New York. http://bit.ly/36iEZ9O

NLC: HOW MICROMOBILITY IN CITIES EVOLVED IN 2019
-> From the rise of the micromobility industry in Santa Monica, California in 2017, through its rapid growth and global expansion in 2018, to its global presence in 2019, the National League of Cities reported on how we have seen a remarkable evolution of this new and popular service and the approach cities are taking to support sustainable mobility for all. Looking back at 2019, here are some of the most impactful trends in micromobility and how we expect them to shape the future of transportation in 2020 and beyond. http://bit.ly/36jB9gG

AV IMPLEMENTATION & IMPLICATIONS FOR TRANSPORT PLANNING
-> VTPI News described a report that explores the impacts of autonomous vehicles, and their implications for various planning issues. (Autonomous Vehicle Implementation Predictions: Implications for Transport Planning: http://bit.ly/37kZ4ha) It investigates how quickly self-driving vehicles are likely to develop and be deployed based on experience with previous vehicle technologies; their likely benefits and costs; and how they are likely to affect travel demands and planning decisions such as optimal road, parking and public transit supply. This analysis indicates that some benefits, such as independent mobility for affluent non-drivers, may begin in the 2020s or 2030s, but most impacts, including reduced traffic and parking congestion (and therefore infrastructure savings), independent mobility for low-income people (and therefore reduced need for public transit), increased safety, energy conservation and pollution reductions, will only be significant when autonomous vehicles become common and affordable, probably in the 2040s to 2050s, and some benefits may require prohibiting human-driven vehicles on certain roadways, which could take even longer.

NINE KEYS TO SAFE DOWNTOWN STREETS
-> If the key to making downtowns safe is to keep automobiles at reasonable speeds--and to protect pedestrians from them--then any serious downtown plan will take pains to address the principal factors that determine driver speed and pedestrian exposure. Public Square reported there are more than a dozen such factors, and most American cities are impacted by most of them. A recent downtown plan for Hammond, IN, revealed 9: the number of driving lanes; lane width; one-way vs. two-way flow; bike lanes; on-street parking; street trees; signals vs. stop signs; pedestrian pushbuttons; and street geometry. http://bit.ly/38rDAPR

HOW CARS WASTE SPACE IN SIX SIMPLE IMAGES
-> Streetsblog USA reported a classic chart from Graphing Parking went newly viral on Twitter this week, but it illustrates the persistent paradox of restaurant parking minimums. Most cafe owners don't get into the food industry to lay asphalt, but city ordinances often require them to build a minimum number of parking stalls that varies based on the square footage of their building. Austin, TX, for instance, requires restaurants under 2,500 square feet to build one spot for every 75 square feet of building area-- the average parking space takes up a staggering 180 square feet. See a graphic that shows a 2,500 square foot restaurant and its 6,500 square foot parking lot plus 5 other graphics about how cars waste space. http://bit.ly/2Rgbl0R

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